Resolutions 2018

Here we are, another year gone by. I think it’s safe to say I’m the world’s slowest writer. Reviewing my goals from 2017 was a laugh.

Let’s see how I did:

  1. Blog 2X/month + a regular Writing Resolutions Review
    So I gave up on the resolutions review since they flew out the window in January. And though I didn’t get two blog posts every month, I did fit in one post every month. Break even.
  2. Send out a monthly newsletter
    I started out strong and then fizzled out toward the end of the year since I was busy writing and editing.
    The Palace of the Two Towers, a free short story, was also finished, covered, and published for newsletter subscribers, so I still call it a Win!
  3. Increase activity on FB, Twitter, and IG by posting something weekly on each platform
    Let’s just pretend this one wasn’t here. Fail.
  4. Redeeming The Demon’s Daughter
    So I commissioned a cover and published this short story after the contest ended. Win!
  5. Sea Deception
    As you know, this series hasn’t been published yet. So what did I accomplish in 2017? I edited Sea Dreams, doubling its word count, and finished writing all of Book 2, Sea Rivals. I’ve started the edit on Book 2. Book 3 is fully plotted and begun, and there’s an idea for 2 more books.

    Covers for Books 1, 2, and 3 are finished and gorgeous.
    Best of all? Sea Deception will be a full novel-length series, not a series of novels. Win, win, win!
  6. Free Worvanz
    Well, since I didn’t finish Sea Deception, I didn’t get back to Free Worvanz, so nothing to report here.

So that’s a wrap for 2017: two published short stories and two novels finished. What do I have planned for 2018? With no promises of a deadline:

  1. Releasing Sea Deception, Books 1 – 3. I still have to finish my edits on Book 2 and write and edit Book 3. Tentative release planned by March 31.
  2. Finish the sequel to Dark Empire.
  3. Write Books 4 – 5 of Sea Deception.
  4. Continue at least monthly blog posts and newsletters.

What are your resolutions for 2018?

Word Wednesday: Heritage vs. Lineage

Learning new words and being able to find the word that means exactly what the story needs can mean the difference between a mediocre story and a brilliant one.

On Wednesdays we will identify an unusual word, provide its definition, and discuss its application or its impact.

Time for another Word Wednesday!

Today I’m doing my civic duty—jury duty, to be exact. I look forward to sharing my adventures soon.

The words we’re reviewing today became a point of contention while I was writing “Redeeming the Demon’s Daughter.”

I chose to use “heritage” twice, and my husband questioned whether it was the right word in each case.

Here are the two original sentences:

  1. “My heritage did not help me either, for I was the daughter of Ravana, the demon who kidnapped their beloved king’s wife.”

  2. “Macchanu could not doubt the evidence of his own eyes, for Maiyarab taught him his heritage, taught him to worship and trust in gods.”

After consulting my handy-dandy dictionary and deciding what made more sense, I changed the first sentence to use “lineage” but kept the second sentence as it was.

So what’s the difference?

Heritage:

  1. Something handed down from the past, as a tradition

  2. Something that comes or belongs to one by reason of birth; an inheritance

  3. Something reserved for one

There’s another specific definition used in Law, but I won’t pretend to instruct about the application of a legal term.

Lineage:

  1. Lineal descent from an ancestor; ancestry or extraction

  2. the line of descendants of a particular ancestor; family

Why did I change Sentence 1?

In the first sentence, Suvi is specifically referring to her father and to her ancestry as a demon. While I also meant her cultural background as a mermaid and a demon, the real meaning I want to convey hinges on her bloodline. So given these definitions, “lineage” describes it better.

Final sentence:

“My lineage did not help me either, for I was the daughter of Ravana, the demon who kidnapped their beloved king’s wife.”

Why didn’t I change Sentence 2?

In this case, Suvi is describing not just her son Macchanu’s parentage, but—more importantly—the cultural and religious aspects of his society and his role in it or obligations to it. So lineage would have changed the meaning of what I was trying to say.

Final sentence:

“Macchanu could not doubt the evidence of his own eyes, for Maiyarab taught him his heritage, taught him to worship and trust in gods.”